Top 5 Most Controversial Poker Hands | PokerStars

There are clear rules in poker. And then, there are the unwritten rules– the points of etiquette. And when is breached, a discussion may ensue, which could become heated. Don’t do it again, I don’t an apology, don’t do it again. Which could result in controversy! Everybody except me is really upset at him.

And when there are controversies, we have a Top 5. From the expanded PokerStars library, here are five times players have crossed the invisible line. I’m going to call. At 5, we find the usually mellow monk, Andy Black, giving a player a piece of his mind in Baden back in ’06. Mattias Eriksson. It’s been folded round to him.

And he’s going to limp in. Wow, what– he can’t possibly limp with that hand. I’m afraid he just has.

And Andy Black’s all in again. This time I have a good hand. And he doesn’t. Peter’s right, but he shouldn’t be saying that. Strictly speaking, Andy’s hand is better than Eriksson’s.

Well he can’t possibly call. No, he’s doing this for Andy’s benefit, to just let him stew do a little bit while he thinks about it. But no, he’s going to fold. Better dwelling.

Better TV time. And his cards go in the muck. Don’t make comments during the hand.

Andy’s kicked off. It’s really bad. And he’s right, of course. You know? Yeah, you’re right.

I was just joking. No no, but it’s not a joke. Yeah? You’re right. It’s not a joke.

Oh, he’s not acting. That’s the second time he’s done that, right? He’s extremely unhappy about this. You made a comment which could influence the pot, yeah?

You can’t do that. Oh, he doesn’t have a good hand. You should better than that. You right then, I apologize.

Just don’t do it again. I don’t want an apology, don’t do it again. This coming from the guy who moved all in out of turn.

Well, you know, sometimes you just get caught in the heat of the moment. It is annoying. It’s OK. Just don’t do it again.

I know you’re, you know, I know forgot, but please don’t forget again. He’s apologized, Andy, move on. –affect the destination of this tournament, you know? Oh, I felt that he needed– All right, let’s just deal the cards, fellas.

Next hand. So which was worse? The crime or the punishment?

Andy makes a fair point. Poker etiquette is there for a reason. Certain things can influence the flow of the hand, even an honest mistake like number 4– from the Million Dollar Cash Game. Think the 1,200, we’re going to see Mike at least call this.

And we haven’t seen him raise those kind of hands– and he calls. He stays true to form and just calls. You– you’re a guy– He probably finds, there’s just too many of the other players like to raise. Remember what I told you I was going to do? You remember? So we got pocket 6’s, pocket 5’s.

You’re the only one that has me beat too. That’s a raise already form Tom. I think if Phil calls this, he could bring in the rest of the table. Well, he has. There’s enough marginal hands out there that– Actually, I was going to raise 12,000, so you save money. Pretty sure Matusow and Benyamine are going to call.

They both have pocket pairs. And if Phil Ivey calls, that could bring in every single person. Phil Ivey the first player in the Million Dollar Cash Game history with over $1 million in front of him.

And he wants more. He calls that bet. –you’re such a bad beat for me. I was going to raise 12,000, he was going to re-raise me and I was just going to get 200,000 this hand.

And you had– 9,600 more. Or whatever it is. Patrik decides to go. Mike’s been relatively tight, but he’s got the kind of hand– he knows if he catches, it could get the lot. So he’s called.

That’s exactly why he’s called. If he can hit his magical 6. Benyamine raises.

Don’t ever call me a coward. I was folding this hand too. How much do you have, Mike? I had 250 starting the hand.

Now we’re playing the game. I mean it was getting a little slow. Wow! What a flop for 10-jack! [INAUDIBLE] at all. I mean, what am I doing?

I’ve got the maniac kid on my right– 33,800– –and I didn’t re-raise him before the flop. –is the bet. I deserve– I guess I deserve to lose. Looks like– I can’t imagine he’s going to get a caller here. There isn’t actually that much for any of the other players.

Phil Ivey’s got a pair and a straight draw, so maybe he’ll get a call from him. It is bottom pair, though. I am so– this is really bad, I am so calling. That was pretty bad, yeah. I don’t see– where’s it– who’s– look it! Can anybody see his cards over here?

That’s all right, Mike, we’ll– [INTERPOSING VOICES] –would you able to see his cards right here? It’s OK, they knew he was holding anyway. Mike, we know you needed a deuce, 3, or 4 anyway.

No, I mean, you talk about your hand, I mean– I didn’t say anything about my hand, I mean, I just thought he was folding. You don’t know who’s in the pot? Well, you have 17 chips on red card. You don’t know who’s in the pot at the beginning of a pot?

You come over here and if you can see it, I’ll give you 10,000– I bet that if I was over there, I would know that– You can see his cards– –that I was in the pot. 10,000 says you can’t see your cards sitting right here. You got a bet.

10,000 says I know everybody who is in the pot from the beginning. I apologize, but there’s no way you could see your cards. Well Mike’s passed out of turn. You want to bet 10,000?

That I always know who’s in the pot? I know who’s in the pot but I thought you folded. For the rest of the session. I can’t see your cards.

Your cards are all hidden by the red chips. OK. Now where was I? A lot of money at stake.

Tempers starting to rise. Pot is 90,000. And It’s 33,000 to call. Of course, it really should be Tom Dwan that Mike Matusow should be apologizing to.

What we go, 33? 3,800. It’s– he’s giving Phil Ivey free information. He knows that Mike Matusow’s not going to raise or play behind him. Phil Ivey going to give it up. Fold?

I think he was the only potential customer here unless David wants to be creative, he doesn’t. Fold. Tom takes that one down. He’s a bit unfortunate no one else caught any of that flop.

Oh, what is going on here? 7-8-9 might have been a better flop for him. The 8-10 might have felt a bit stronger, and the pocket 6’s might have even played. There were at least three etiquette infractions in that hand.

But the real controversy? Those graphics! Am I right?

And number 3 is from Prague in 2015 and asks the question– what is a call not a call? Ah, Gleb’s raise of a super small river bet got a fold before. Pretty good reason to think it might work again. As the bluff from Tremzin, 2.3 million.

It doesn’t look like it’s going to work. Ensan re-raises. Good call. You call? Yep.

You win. I’ve just 5. 5.

Yeah. It was a good call. I think there’s some confusion here. I think Gleb thought Ensan was calling.

Ut oh. Oh I win. Yeah. Yes.

I win. [INAUDIBLE] of 6. I said good call. He raised to– Call. You call. No no, I said good call.

I call– I raise! Hey, man, I called. I called.

I called. I called. I called. I say I called. Uh, floor? Um.

Did you hear a call? He bet 400. Of course I’m not calling. We say– He’s saying raise. He’s saying raise. No, you said raise– He didn’t say raise.

Raise, my friend. You said call. I said good call, not that I’m calling.

How can I call with 8-4? [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH] Well this is awkward. Let’s go back to the tape and hear what Gleb said. Good call. Good call.

You win. He thought Ensan was calling and he praised him on his call. Yeah. It was good call. So I’m going to turn these cards over– [INTERPOSING VOICES] OK, gentlemen. It’s OK.

I don’t want more. It’s OK. It’s OK. Of course I’m not calling– No no no, I don’t want.

It’s OK, man. Yet another amazing display of sportsmanship. Just be careful. Yeah, yeah.

It’s OK Sorry for that. It’s my mistake, but– But next time please don’t bluff. [LAUGHS] It’s not good. But you bluff also. I have 5! [LAUGHTER] It was [INAUDIBLE] flop.

You have nothing. [LAUGHTER] Good call is probably the last complement Gleb Tremzin has ever given. That’s what you get for being nice. Number 2 has some super high roller hijinks and a questionable play from Daniel Negreanu. Welcome to the table, everybody. Ace-king for Daniel Negreanu.

Oh, apparently someone other than Steve Silverman is allowed to pick up a hand. Negreanu raises. And raises back! Oops!

29, buddy! 45 for you, not 29. 45? It’s so nice. I mean, it’s pretty nice! I thought it was 29 first, too.

Oh [BLEEP]. That is an 11x raise from Daniel. And an apparent misclick. Weird.

How much you playing? 350, so about 4. Oh man, this could get real ugly for Steve Silverman if he reads Daniel’s sheepishness for weakness.

He’s got king-jack suited. He’s got everyone at the table covered. Maybe he won’t go too crazy, though, because it’s clear Daniel did want to raise in the first place, he just didn’t want to raise that much. This spot is weirder than walking into a room where people have just been talking about you. All in. Silverman shoves!

Whoops. And Negreanu calls. All in. Wooow. Did you get me?

No, I have ace-king, but– He got you. OK. This is the biggest pot of the tournament. That really was a misclick. The mystic may have been genuine, but him feeling bad about it definitely isn’t. Well it’s mainly spades on the flop.

9-6-4. So far, so good for Negreanu. Only three cards capable of saving Silverman. Finally got that one in! Pfft!

Hey! You have clubs, right? Oh, OK, I thought it was spades. Man.

Now he needs a queen or a jack? Correct. It’s running hot. Huh? It’s dangerous. It’s very dangerous against this guy.

He’s running to it, huh? The river is an ace. I got 438-5. Negreanu doubles up. He wins a massive pot.

He’s chip leader once again by a considerable margin. Misclick you say? You’re suspect, Negreanu. You’re suspect.

The question is, did I do it on purpose to trap the big blind? Or did I just do what’s called a misclick? Raising to larger size than normal and then talking about how it’s a misclick and how you meant to make it nine, if that’s not actually the case, I think that’s a little bit shady. That really was a misclick. I have no problem with that sort of move, it’s all part of the psychology of the game.

And you have to guess for yourself whether or not I’m acting or not. It’s part of the game. We played a pot for the chip lead. Very big pot that basically just shouldn’t have happened.

One of the things about being a good poker player is you got to keep your cards close to the vest. It’s hard to give someone credit when you find out they have priors. Like our number 1 controversial play– it’s the now infamous angle shoot from Madrid 2011. You might be wondering if he can get away with a raise. The board’s pretty dry, however, so he’d be repping a very strong hand.

He makes just a call. The turn card is another 5, Freitez continues to run golden. Freitez runs better than Usain Bolt. Goes check, check, and a 6 on the river giving Freitez a full house. Freitez boats up.

I think he missed some value on the turn, but I doubt he’ll be checking behind this time. It’s going be really tough for Eugene to not think he has the best hand. He’s going to put out a value bet.

275,000. How much? A little Hollywooding, maybe. Re-raise. Raise coming. I’m sorry, I call.

What? Whoa, whoa. Uh-oh.

I call. He said raise. You announced raise.

I no speak English. You announced raise. No speak English? No way he meant to just call with the full house. That was not a mistake. Thomas Kremser’s has been called to the table.

I believe we’re looking at an angle shoot here. Freitez knows the rule as that his raise must stand. And I think he’s trying to make it look like he didn’t want to raise so he’ll get a call out of Eugene. I think that is exactly the same situation that we had already in this tournament when you did exactly the same move when you had the nuts. I’m just sharing information with you. OK?

Wow. Freitez has got previous for this. You understand? So I force you to raise now and you have the option, what do you do? Twice, then you need to put in another 275.

I think this is well-handled by Thomas Kremser. He’s forcing Freitez to min-raise, but he’s told Eugene Yanayt that this is a move that Freitez makes when he’s got a monster. So what– Because of what happened before. Oh, you force him to min-raise?

Yeah. OK. It’s not my option whether or not he raises, it’s my option what to do now, right? That what you’re saying? Yeah.

OK, understand. Armed with that information, does Eugene Yanayt now fold top pair? I know we’re not supposed to actively root for players, but I sure hope he mucks. Make Freitez look like a chump.

He makes the call. Freitez shows the full house. That’s what– the same situation again. No, I know.

I heard about this before the tournament started. It is so ugly, I can’t tell you. Ugly. Move was so dirty, I feel like I need a shower. I heard about this guy a week ago. I’m sorry?

I heard about this guy a week ago. It’s OK. I’ve never seen Thomas Kremser look so disgusted. Speaking of disgusted, look at the other players at the table. Look at Juan Maceiras.

You know, back in the old days, running an angle shoot could get you actually shot. Controversially, that’s the end of our Top 5. It’s all right, MIke.

We know a deuce– Will you be able to see his cards right here? It’s OK. It’s OK. You should know better that, yeah?

Petty Perspective: Augment Slots

This isn’t exactly a new concept, but it’s still something I wanted to discuss. The topic of this video is: “Should every Warframe, Primes included, come with a single slot specifically made for Augments?”

I personally think it would be a great idea, but there have to be a few changes in order to preserve build diversity and possibly prevent builds from becoming even more overpowered.

1: If an Augment slot becomes reality, it needs to drain your mod capacity rather than increase it, like every mod that isn’t an Aura. This way, in order to achieve the state of “a perfect and strong build with a touch of Eternal War”, you have to work for it, that is by applying Forma.

2: More Augments have to be introduced to the game. Currently, Volt, Excalibur, and Mag each have the greatest number of Augments, coming in at 5. Most other frames in the game have at least 3, if any, because there are a few frames that do not have any Augments at all, such as Atlas and Equinox. If Digital Extremes were to give every Warframe in the game, besides the 3 starter frames, at least 4 equally good mods, 1 per ability, in addition to the 1 Augment slot per Warframe, it would encourage build diversity among players.

If all 4 mods are equal in terms of their power and usability, the players will take the Augment that will improve the ability they use the most, or the Augment that will be the most beneficial to the team. 3: If players find that a new Augment also works in another way besides its intended purpose, then Digital Extremes needs to embrace their players’ ingenuity by including that newfound method into the Augment’s original design, unless that ingenuity is harmful to both the players and the overall experience. I know I’m not the only one who remembers the Greedy Pull nerf. 4: If Digital Extremes decide to use feedback from the players in order to create a new Augment, then they have to listen to it carefully and develop accordingly.

Sometimes it feels like some Augments don’t make any sense, not even from a player’s standpoint. Currently, when it comes to Augments, the player has a choice. They can either: A: Not take an Augment, keeping their full build intact. or B: Sacrifice 1 slot on their build to take along an Augment that might or might not make a difference, depending on which Augment was taken. If Augments were given the same treatment as Exilus mods, that is by being given their own slot but not made mandatory, I believe it would help build diversity among players greatly.

To summarize, I think slots for Augment mods on every Warframe would be a wonderful addition, but in order to do it right, every frame needs an Augment that isn’t too overpowered or too weak for each of their abilities in order to encourage players to take an Augment with them, depending on their playstyle. Thank you for watching.